Mexican life

Water & chocolate

AFTER A FIVE-DAY, unusual dry spell here last week, it’s raining again, which is what the Goddess intends for our neck of the woods through all of September.

And, as usual too, I headed downtown yesterday afternoon for a café Americano negro, which I normally get free at my sister-in-law’s coffee shop. But she closed yesterday to rest.

Seems the Independence Day festivities over the weekend pooped her out. She had to sit with her cigarettes and Coke while watching the cash register fill with tourist pesos.

Darn near did her in.

So I walked to another side of the plaza and sat at a different coffee shop where I had to pay. I ordered hot chocolate. It started to rain. I grabbed my camera and panned around.

You might have heard of our latest earthquake. It did quite a bit of damage in Mexico City, more than the previous one a couple of weeks ago. When it struck yesterday we were in a supermarket in the nearby capital of our state.

I was walking down an aisle, and about five little cartons of something fell off the shelf directly in my path. I had felt nothing, but the store alarm went off, and we had to stand in the parking lot about five minutes.

Then we went back in and finished shopping. It was only later that we learned of the extensive damage and deaths in Mexico City. We had initially planned on making our twice-yearly visit to our condo there the first week of this month.

That was when the last quake struck. It was centered far away in the Pacific and didn’t do much damage, if any, in Mexico City. But our neighbors emailed us it was quite a jolt.

We rescheduled the trip for the first week of October, but now I’m a bit concerned. Gotta do it, however. We’re in the northern part of Mexico City, and our building suffered no damage yesterday. Bet it scared the neighbors, however.

Would have scared us too had we been there. Our apartment is on the fourth floor of a five-story building.

25 thoughts on “Water & chocolate

  1. Rain but no earthquakes at your house. Sounds like a good day. Looking at your videos of rain is about as close as I can get to that topic most days here in the semi-arid part of TX. Stay safe and keep those videos and pics coming, señor.

    Like

    1. Ricardo: Rain is no issue here between June and the end of September. Often it runs into October a bit, and has even been known to rain on the Day of the Dead in the first week of November. As for quakes, we get them here, but we apparently live in a relatively stable area, quake-wise. I’ve felt about five or six since I moved here in 2000, and they’ve all been relatively mild, just a little movement. I hope to keep it that way.

      Like

  2. We are on the second floor of a 4/5 story building. Not sure how to count the terrace on the roof. If we were to begin to shake, would we run up the stairs, in case it pancaked? Or would we run into the tiny narrow street? My Husband thinks, up.

    Like

    1. Beverly: I vote down for two reasons. It’s far easier, and you’re much closer to the street than the roof. But the chances of anything like that happening are minuscule. Fret not.

      Like

    2. Growing up in California, we were taught to shelter in a doorway or under heavy furniture. Running outside was frowned upon as things could fall there. But in Mexico, running outdoors seems to be what people do. I’d investigate what’s in the street, whether there are things that would likely fall on you, and then based on that info make a more organized escape plan.

      Best of luck.

      Like

      1. Upon further inspection, there is no safe place! Streets are so narrow and electric lines are like spiders above the corner where we are. They would fall too. I think up would be our only hope.

        I start thinking about what we would need to take with us. Passports, money, the ID we have left after Al was pickpocketed and tennis shoes to be able to walk in the rubble. Would not have time for most of that much less water. Yuk.

        Like

  3. My first, last and only, I hope, was the 1992 Northridge CA earthquake felt in Las Vegas on the 9th floor of a hotel. Didn’t know what was making the curtains sway or why I felt dizzy. Lots of people looked out their doors into the hall and we headed for the staircase, going down.

    Like

    1. Carole: The first quake I ever felt, and it was fairly light, happened when I lived in Puerto Rico in the 1970s. I was perched on the johnny in my fifth-floor apartment. Now that’s a sensation. A weird sound came up from below. It was not a sound I created.

      Like

  4. I am glad that everything is okay for you and the Señora regarding the Earthquake. The first report I heard (which was not from any news source) was that Mexico City had been completely destroyed. It was about eight o’clock before I found out otherwise. Several hours of intense concern.

    Like

    1. Ray: Completely destroyed! That’s a good one, and a highly unrealistic one too. But I appreciate the concern. Gracias. I know it was all for us, right?

      Got word a few hours ago from our Mexico City neighbors that our apartment building came through unscathed. That’s good. I do have quake insurance on it, however. I think I will up the coverage next time it comes up for renewal.

      Like

      1. My daughter-in-law has a tendency to be a little melodramatic. She said “There’s no report from Puerto Rico, which means that the hurricane winds were so strong that even the monitoring equipment must have been destroyed. And oh, by the way a 7.1 magnitude earthquake destroyed Mexico City.”

        By the time I got home, all I could get from T.V. was “Trump said this, Hillary whined that, and so-and-so at the Emmys had this to say.”

        Yes, I was concerned.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. We flew out of Mexico City yesterday at 9:15 a.m., several hours before the earthquake hit. I had no idea of the event until my sister told me about it.

    Saludos,
    Don Cuevas

    Like

    1. Don Cuevas: Well, what an incredible streak of luck. Happy for you. Really. I had forgotten you were over there, and you normally stay in those areas that were most affected, I believe.

      Like

  6. You may want to postpone the visit. My family is accounted for and safe but there are many that were not so lucky… buildings that made it are now not safe… very scary and sad situation for the children in schools and families trapped. This will take awhile to recover… but Mexico is strong.

    Like

    1. Thanks, Sylnuss. It’s still almost two weeks away. I’ll play it by ear. But things get back to normal rather fast. Not the buildings, of course, but life in general. Yes, Mexico is strong. It always amazes me, after such an event, to see those photos of Mexicans absolutely swarming over fallen buildings looking for and saving people. Would you see that in the United States? Not on your life.

      Like

  7. I was at my desk online when the quake began. My whole house shook for what seemed to be about 90 seconds while the windows rattled. Well, I said to myself, shake, rattle and roll, just like the old Elvis song.

    Everything is connected where I live by reinforced concrete. The concrete street is connected to the concrete sidewalk, which is connected to my house and to the houses of my neighbors. We all shook together.

    Like

    1. Andrés: Interesting. As I mentioned above, I was walking down the aisle in a supermarket in the state capital. Felt nothing. I wonder what happened here at home. It all looked the same when we returned.

      In any event, I’m glad you and your abode are still intact.

      Like

  8. I love thunderstorms, but am less thrilled about the Mexican alternative to downspouts, instead dumping rain from roof height right onto the sidewalk.

    As for the earthquake, yeah, you’d better visit your place. But make sure first you won’t need some kind of inspection before you go in.

    I’ve heard that the number of collapsed buildings was only about 30. But I haven’t heard how many buildings were damaged, and how many will have to be torn down. I’d imagine that latter number will be more than 30. Of course time will tell.

    I just learned that my friend Edgar’s store in Tehuacán will have to be vacated. The building is adobe and has developed some alarming cracks and bulges in some of the walls. And the aftershocks are still coming. Ugh.

    Saludos,

    Kim G

    Like

    1. Kim: Our next-door neighbor there on the fourth floor of our concrete building tells us there is no damage from either the first quake or the second one a week later. We’re in the less-struck northern end of town, plus the building was constructed after 1985 when stiffer construction rules went into place. Of course, that does not mean anybody paid any attention to the new rules. I’ll just pray so.

      I’ve read the number of collapsed building in CDMX is 44 or so, not 30. Lots more than that are damaged. As you note, time will tell. We’ll be spending three nights there next week, just three. Then we’ll hightail back home to higher ground.

      Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.