Mexican life

Best-laid plans

ON MOVING OVER the Rio Bravo at the turn of the century, I had a to-do list of three items.

First, learn Spanish. I had no intention of living here without learning the native tongue. Alas, so many of my former countrymen do just that. Tsk, tsk.

Second, get married. I had no intention of living here solo for the rest of my life. I don’t like being single.

Third, with my new bride’s help, buy land and construct a home. See, my to-do list had an order of sorts. No. 1 was a lengthy process, and it’s ongoing.

At age 55, learning a new language is not something that comes easily. And No. 3 required No. 2 first.

And No. 2 required No. 1  because my child bride cannot converse in English. Being able to talk to your wife is advisable.

No. 2 was fairly easy because, truth be told, I had women coming out of the proverbial woodwork. Most did not interest me. I finally found one that interested me, and I married her about two years after moving to Mexico.

Her help with the home construction was immeasurable. She not only speaks Spanish, she’s a civil engineer.

Aside from learning a new language, which is a process without end, I had mostly accomplished my three goals in a bit more than three years. I’m so proud of myself.

I’ve been coasting ever since.

speccleaner
My child bride cleaning her glasses with her skirt a few months ago.

18 thoughts on “Best-laid plans

  1. You are just an orderly guy, señor. Compliments to you. And you chose well. Language and everything else. Saludos!

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  2. You’ve done well, Felipe. You are right to be proud of yourself. I would love to be fluent in Spanish but only have a basic working knowledge. My wife is fluent in Spanish and French, so I tend to lean on her a bit. I’m sure if we lived in Mexico full-time I’d put more effort into it.

    Your wife is one year younger than mine. I guess I’ve got a child bride too.

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    1. Brent: Having a Spanish-fluent wife must be a real help. You’re lucky in that. I’m lucky. You’re lucky.

      If one moves down here as a couple, it really makes learning Spanish a challenge because you’re constantly speaking English at home. I wanted to learn Spanish, but I was forced into it too.

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    1. Carole: Strangely enough, were it not for the labor union at the San Juan Star, a pack of communists, literally, especially the leaders, I likely would not have been forced out of a job due to a long strike. I didn’t speak Spanish at the time, so getting some sort of other work was pretty much out of the question. I really liked living in Puerto Rico, and I very possibly would still be there today.

      Recent events, however, and not just the hurricane, make me very glad I did not stay.

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  3. So they come out of the woodwork , eh? I have to laugh. Many years ago when I took a group of college kids to Honduras, a 15-year-old girl told one of my charges that “age doesn’t matter in Honduras.”

    I suppose it doesn’t when you’re trying to get a ticket North.

    I think you chose well. Beauty and brains.

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    1. Ray: Yes, they were coming out of the woodwork, from 18 to 80, well, almost. Lots of factors cause that, economic, cultural, and, of course, I was far from being chopped meat 18 years ago.

      But I found the only one over 21 who had never been married, never even shacked up with anyone, no kids, no dogs, no cats, no debts, perfect. Good-looking to boot. That she had no kids was the biggie. Virtually all women over puberty here have kids, often lots of them.

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  4. Of the three, the second was your greatest accomplishment. Your Spanish is something to be admired. And your house is a thing of joy. Not to mention that incredible condo. But, your wife is who has made you who you are in Mexico. Well done to both of you.

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  5. I have similar goals. Number one, though still continuing as you note, is pretty much accomplished. Number two was looking very good in 2016, but then fell victim to a green-eyed monster. (Jealousy on his part.) And number three, well, I’ve been window-shopping for ages. However, I’m feeling better about having dragged my feet after the earthquake hit CDMX.

    But if I ever get back there, I’ll pursue #2 and #3 with some vigor, and hopefully get there. At least there are plenty of available guys. If you’re a foreigner in Mexico, you definitely benefit from some cachet.

    Saludos,

    Kim G
    Redding, CA
    Where #2 would be impossible.

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