Mexican life

Big changes in our old town

OUR HUGE, beautiful plaza hasn’t changed that much in decades, but we’re seeing some major alterations now.

The cobblestone street circling the plaza, plus a street spoke shooting off thataway, are being totally torn up. There will be a narrowing of the streets, widening of the sidewalks, a bike path and improved drainage.

Drainage improvements may be the best of all.

Currently, the five-month rainy season creates deep lakes in parts of the street circling the plaza, lakes that wash up onto the sidewalks and sometimes into businesses, a massive problem.

The work started weeks ago, and will take months because lots of the work is done by hand. Right now, two sides of the plaza street are torn up, and all traffic has been rerouted to the other two streets. One imagines that when the two streets being renovated are completed, the two other streets will follow suit, and traffic will be routed over the renovated sides.

I’m real smart that way.

The work started as soon as the Day of the Dead hoopla ended in early November, and the tourist mobs went home.

Ever since I moved here and, one supposes, for years before, mayors came and went, and little changed. However, the last election, a couple of years ago, put a fellow into the mayor’s office, a guy named Báez, and there’s been ongoing change ever since, and it’s all been good change.

Other important downtown streets, previously potholed obstacle courses, are either being renovated or have been renovated. A sports center was recently opened. It has a soccer field, two tennis courts, a running track, a gym, and a municipal auditorium.

I voted for this guy Báez, and I’d do it again. He ran as the candidate of the leftist Party of the Democratic Revolution, but was supported by the communist party too. They call themselves the Workers Party, but their scarlet flag with a yellow star tells you who they really are.

You never know with whom you’ll end up in bed.

Báez also initiated a humongous Christmas display on the plaza last year, life-sized artificial elephants, giraffes, burros, etc., and that drew lots of tourists here, which was the point. But it’s fun.

I’ve seen the plans for the plaza via video animation, and we’re going to be spectacular. Of course, if you’re planning to move here, be aware that you’ll freeze your butt off in winter. Go to San Miguel instead.

No Spanish required over there.

12 thoughts on “Big changes in our old town

  1. We loved that Plaza. Great watching several generations of a family enjoy each other there. I see this impacted the ice cream stands. Hope they were able to relocate during construction?

    Like

    1. Steve: Your perspective is a bit skewed. The ice cream stands are located on one of the two streets yet to be attacked by renovation. They’re still going strong, and I imagine they simply will be shifted a bit when work starts on their side.

      Like

  2. You are safe. Most Gringos (like me for one) do not want to be frozen. That’s what puts so many of the snowbirds on the beaches every year. On the other hand, cutesy up the place enough we might just come down anyway. Saludos, señor.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ricardo: You’d think, right? But when I moved here 17 years ago, there were about 40 Gringos in residence. Now there are at least 10 times that number. It’s worrisome.

      Like

    1. YaYa Girl: Saying the winters are “cool” is putting lipstick on a pig’s snout. Most winters, it freezes overnight. There are been some exceptions to this, a year here, a year there, but mostly you’re looking at overnight freezes in January and February, and nobody has central heating systems. They’re just not appropriate for our architecture. I’m sitting here at the moment in a heavy coat, a scarf and a knit cap pulled down over my ears. And I’m indoors! Looks like this year is going to be a doozy, according to forecasts plus what we’ve already experienced. First freeze happened in the last week of November. November!!

      As for the mayor, can’t imagine he’s a commie. He ran on the leftist PRD ticket, which is not commie, but the commie party endorsed him. In a nation with lots of “poor people,” communism always has appeal because who doesn’t want “free” stuff? The notion always sounds swell to the lower-income brackets.

      Like

  3. There’s nothing like a good ‘leftist govt’ to shake things up and make civic improvements. But political corruption with both left & right govts is always just around the corner. Its all about the person & not the party. Apparently you voted for the good one. Stay warm.

    Like

    1. Smokesilver: I think the party, as represented by the person, has much to do with a place’s condition. Take a look at the debt-ridden, crime-infested cities in the United States that have been run by Democrats for decades. Generally, GOP cities are better places to live. You may beg to differ. No problem.

      Like

  4. Interesting that the work is “by hand.” After observing such work on my first trip to Honduras back in 2002, I offered to send a cement mixer to the local missionary to help make such work easier and efficient.

    His response: “Do you realize how many people that would put out of work?”

    Like

    1. Ray: The extent of the hand work here is fascinating. When they finish, it looks far better than what you generally find in the United States. And it takes far longer to complete the work. But who’s in a hurry?

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Hey, Felipe, am I in the penalty box? I wrote you say that the beautiful plaza in Pátzcuaro could be much improved if they replace the LED lights someone installed. Maybe they have been taken out already. But my pithy comment never appeared.

    Like

    1. Señor Lanier: You are not in the penalty box, and surely would not be there with a comment about LED lights. How could you have turned that into a diatribe against the great President Trump? You couldn’t. That’s how.

      That comment is neither in the trash file or the spam file, so I can only assume you think you wrote it, but you didn’t. Age happens.

      As for replacing the lights, I liked the lights before, and I like them now, and I doubt they will turn back the lights due to Gringo complaints. So we must endure.

      Like

Comments are closed.