21 thoughts on “An America worth remembering

  1. Brings tears to my eyes. Such a powerful speech that is still true today even though there are many who disagree with me and the speech. I looked for the author but found conflicting reports but did not dig deeply. Maybe you know … ps: my grandson is a Navy SEAL and has been over 10 years.

    Thanks for posting this most marvelous moving speech.

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    1. Peggy: The speech was the opening scene in the movie Patton, so the author(s) would have been the screenwriters of that movie. Great movie if you haven’t seen it. Interesting about your grandson. Thanks.

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    2. P.S.: Interesting about your grandson. I’ve never met one of those guys that I know of, but when I lived in Puerto Rico during the early 1970s, an Army Ranger captain rented the house next door when I lived on the beach in a San Juan suburb. There was, and probably still is, a big military base on Puerto Rico. The Rangers are similar to the SEALs, just likely a little less versatile.

      This guy, about 28 at the time, was huge and incredibly likable. He owned a red Pontiac GTO muscle car that he let me drive once. Very nice.

      The captain had just returned from Vietnam and, I imagine, was still a little on edge. He slept with a Bowie knife under his pillow, even there in San Juan. About a mile away there was a housing project full of housing project people. One night, one of these housing project people decided to do some burglary. He made a very wrong choice of breaking into the house next door. He then compounded his stupidity by walking into the captain’s bedroom.

      The captain woke up. He jumped out of the bed, Bowie knife in hand, bellowing at the top of his lungs. The housing project fellow escaped, but the next morning I got to admire the hole he had left in the middle of the screen door, which he had not even paused long enough to open. He went straight through. True story.

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    1. Steve: I’ve seen lots of them. One that’s always stuck in my mind was Glory, the one about the black unit in the Yankee army during the Civil War. Now that was a good movie.

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  2. David Brooks, a renowned columnist in the NY Times of conservative leaning politically, had a column which was brought to my attention last week. Brooks, a person I believe is a smart man, went on and on about how the GOP is rotting from the core because of the current administration and its poor quality. In his opinion, of course. I wouldn’t mind sitting and talking to him point by point on that opinion and what leads him to believe the things he wrote about. I must remember to look at the comments from people who read that column.

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    1. Carole: Brooks is the token conservative on the NYT, and his conservatism is quite questionable, so this does not surprise me. If an actual conservative were to be hired by the NYT, I suspect their building would collapse.

      Meanwhile, the Trump Administration marches on. Such fun to watch.

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  3. War in the movies is nothing like the real thing. It has been over fifty years, and now I wonder, just what it was all for. President Trump went to Viet Nam; even John McCain has gone back. The South Vietnamese we supported have returned, and now they are the heart and soul of the new economy. What did we get out of it?

    China is claiming ownership of the China Sea. They think there is oil there. Let them have it. We have invested untold fortunes and lives in wars in the Middle East, and what have we gotten for it? Those people hated us before the wars, and they still hate us now.

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    1. Señor Gill: I’ve never been in a war, so I cannot comment of the realism of war movies. I’m sure you are correct, however. But “Saving Private Ryan” may be an exception, having gained lots of comments from people who were there or had been in other wars, saying it was very realistic.

      As for the world hating the United States, hating winners is common, an unattractive aspect of human nature. The Allied Powers of Western Europe surely did not hate the United States at the end of WWII, of course. Quite the contrary. But that generation is mostly dead, and Europeans are back to hating the United States again. They are ignoramuses.

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      1. There are plenty of countries that are winners that are not hated. Don’t blind yourself to the fact that the American empire stands on shakier and shakier moral grounds.

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        1. Kim: There has only been one Big Kahuna on the Earth of late, and most people detest a winner. Well, not nice people, but so many people are not nice. One must always keep in mind that 50 percent of the human race is below average in intelligence.

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  4. Yes, let them enjoy their Muslim friends. I see some bozo tried to bomb the New York subway. He was from Bangladesh. The first bomb went off prematurely. It got him. Hopefully, it took out his Obamaphone and food stamp card.

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  5. Americans love war and war movies. Almost every movie or TV show when we were kids were about war or winning the west with a gun against injuns or bad hombres.

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    1. Andrés: Your assertion would have to be revised for it to be accurate because I used to be an American, and I do not love war. Quite the contrary. I usually do like war movies, so you mostly got me there. But I intentionally have never seen Saving Private Ryan due to its reputation of being very true to life.

      However, I am smart enough and educated enough to know that war is part of the human experience, what we are, always has been and always will be. Anyone who believes war can be eliminated has a bee in his or her bonnet. War is eternal precisely because there are so bad hombres and injuns. You can’t kill them all because when one falls, another pops up.

      I like the video.

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  6. On May 7th, 1915 the “Lusitania” was sunk by a German U-boat off the coast of Ireland. It was the sister ship of the Titanic.

    The sinking of the Lusitania with the loss of almost 1,200 lives caused such outrage that it helped to propel the U.S. into the First World War. But now divers have revealed a dark secret about the cargo carried by the Lusitania on its final journey in May 1915. Munitions they found in the hold suggest that the Germans had been right all along in claiming the ship was carrying war materials and was a legitimate military target. The disaster was used to whip up anti-German anger, especially in the U.S., where 128 of the 1,198 victims came from.

    The diving team estimates that around four million rounds of U.S.-manufactured Remington .303 bullets lie in the Lusitania’s hold at a depth of 300ft. The Germans had insisted the Lusitania – the fastest liner in the North Atlantic – was being used as a weapons ship to break the blockade Berlin had been trying to impose around Britain since the outbreak of hostilities in August 1914. Winston Churchill, who was first Lord of the Admiralty and has long been suspected of knowing more about the circumstances of the attack than he let on in public, wrote in a confidential letter shortly before the sinking that some German submarine attacks were to be welcomed.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1098904/Secret-Lusitania-Arms-challenges-Allied-claims-solely-passenger-ship.html#ixzz50nUr4ZQL

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  7. In 1915-16, several groups (among them German-Americans, but also pacifists and socialists) tried to keep the United States out of the war by demanding an embargo on munitions shipments to all belligerents. The Wilson administration, however, argued that wartime contracts with participating nations were still within the scope of American neutrality. At the same time, many influential Americans, including banker J.P. Morgan, came out in open support of the Allies. In fact, Morgan soon became the leading financier of the war effort by providing Britain, France, and Russia with loans and by convincing other bankers to do the same. Opponents of the war and the Wilson administration alike claimed that Morgan was trying to draw the United States into the war in order to rescue his loans. A loss on the part of the Allies would have indeed devastated the American economy and financial sector.

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