Mexican life

Our spectacular pond

lake
Photographed by yours truly.

IN THE TROTSKY Museum in Mexico City there’s a framed photo on the wall, a shot of the old commie Leon fishing from a skiff in our lake. Perhaps if he’d stayed here, he would have avoided that pick in his head, the one that killed him.

Yesterday was the 16th birthday of our nephew whom we once called the Little Vaquero, but he’s not so little anymore. A birthday shindig was thrown for him at a scenic lookout that’s called the Estribo. There are two Estribos in the area, the big one and the little one. This photo was shot from the big one, which is higher than the little one.

The view, as you can plainly see, is spectacular.

I took this shot about 6:30 p.m. There are islands in the lake that are reachable via motor launches from a dock that’s not far from downtown.

Nice, huh?

22 thoughts on “Our spectacular pond

  1. Felipe: I have been to the island twice. Once, while we sat in a restaurant, one of the workers was laying out some fish on a table to advertise his wares. Every time he left, a female dog would scurry out and steal a fish. He would come back out, see it missing and replace it. Repeated 3 times before he saw the dog. Entertaining.

    I fear that now, I could not climb the stairs to the top anymore. They are a challenge.

    Like

    1. Kris: There are a number of islands out there, four or five. I don’t know how many are inhabited. I should know, but I don’t. You’re referring to the famous one, of course, Janitzio. I’ve only been there twice, both briefly, especially the second. I’ve never climbed to the top. I doubt I will ever go out there again. It’s a tourist trap. The best part about the whole thing is the boat ride.

      Like

          1. Señor Cotton: You’re clearly a sturdier — and younger — man than I. Yes, I am sure the view is lovely. As is the one in the photo which required no extreme climb to anywhere. I always opt for the easy way out.

            Like

      1. We went with another couple the second time, and the boat driver offered to take us for a tour. We did an extra half hour or more going around the island and a bit more wandering. The driver, as is very common there, spoke quite good English and since I was speaking Spanish with him and translating for our guests, started speaking English. Earned a tip for his efforts on a slow day.

        Like

        1. Kris: I haven’t found it very common here that people speak good English. Maybe they do, and I just don’t know it due to speaking Spanish to them. I even go so far as speaking Spanish even when someone addresses me in English. But few people do that.

          Like

          1. Felipe: I found that a lot of people spoke English due to the number of people in the area who have worked in the U.S. On our trips to Morelia, we would park at Walmart and taxi into the city. Very often the taxi drivers spoke English. You probably drive your own car in town, and since you and your wife speak Spanish, that would be the language most would use.

            Like

            1. Kris: That all makes sense. I’m still glad that living here is nothing like living in San Miguel where everybody speaks English. I don’t think there are even any Mexicans left in San Miguel.

              Like

  2. Beautiful shot and view from up there, except for the incredibly ugly statue of Morelos, one of the worst examples of the Socialist Realism phase Mexican artists went through, I guess during the ’30s. Steve Cotton would know about that. There’s a giant S.R. statue of Benito Juarez in Querétaro that is almost as ugly.

    al

    Like

    1. Señor Lanier: There is also a huge statue of Lázaro Cárdenas in the same style on the street heading into downtown Pátzcuaro. While that style certainly is not lovely, I find it sort of interesting in a clunky way. Does not bother me.

      By the way, I did not send your comment to the moderation pile. Don’t know why that happened. WordPress makes mistakes at times.

      Saludos.

      Like

      1. Bet you what happened is that I forgot my password and got into an altercation with WordPress trying to reset it. All’s good now. BTW, thanks for the recommendation that I use Disqus for comments. Though it took me a while, the comments function seems to work well. Al

        Like

        1. Señor Lanier: I’m here to serve. As for Disqus, it’s an excellent comment system, far, far superior to what comes attached to Blogger. The comment system that comes with WordPress is very similar to Disqus with the sole, important exception that one cannot edit one’s own comment on WordPress. The blog owner has to do it. I wish it were not like that.

          Like

Comments are closed.