Category Archives: Mexican life

Hacienda doings

BEEN QUIET of late, so here’s what’s happening.

As I write this around 9 a.m. Saturday, I’m waiting for Abel the Deadpan Yardman to arrive for the weekly lawn trim. For a few days it looked like the rainy season had wound down, but Thursday we were deluged with torrents and hail.

Enough already!

* * * *

Soon, for a few days, we’ll be in Mexico City tending to chores related to having an apartment there, dusting, sweeping, paying bills. The visit will end the longest spell we’ve not done this since we “moved in” over a decade ago.

Eight months of absence.

We were planning, as usual, to visit the first week of September, but we held off for some reason I don’t recall. This was fortunate because we would have been sleeping in our fourth-floor bedroom when the first quake hit.

Let’s wait a month, we decided.  Then, two weeks later, the larger quake hit. Growing more apprehensive, we delayed again. So, in a few days more … with our fingers crossed.

If we don’t survive, know that I’ve enjoyed interacting with you — well, some of you. Most remain mum — these 12 years.

* * * *

I have a tip regarding the internet.

I’ve used all the major browsers and some lesser-known ones too. I like to experiment, plus I have all the free time in the world. You know the biggies, Chrome, Explorer, Firefox and Safari. Opera’s fairly big too, used mostly by Europeans.

Opera is excellent, by the way.

serveimageI’ve also tried Brave, Yandex, Vivaldi and others that I’ve forgotten. But recently I hit the jackpot with a browser I’d never heard off. I found it on a list of ten-best for 2017. It was right there in the middle.

Maxthon.

Had it been my list, I would have put it at the top. It is clean, logical, fast and good-looking (looks count!). There is a fast-responding user forum if you need it.

Copying photos off the web requires one click! Maxthon is full of fun surprises, and it’s superior to all the biggies.

One particular item I like is its password saver. Most browsers include their own password saver, but they don’t seem serious about it. Maxthon’s is locked tighter than the proverbial drum, but is also incredibly easy to use. This means you don’t have to mess with Dashlane, Lastpass and their ilk.

Maxthon was born in 2003, and it’s the brainchild of Chinamen. Now it’s headquartered in San Francisco, California, not China.

No charge for this tip.

(An internet amiga is still using Netscape!)

* * *  *

My child bride began the process last Tuesday of getting four tooth implants. A few weeks ago, I ended the same process with only one implant. She is something of a dental sissy, and we’ve had lots of drama since Tuesday.

The immediate aftereffects of having four posts pushed into her jaws have calmed a bit by this morning, and we’re both happy for that. She returns to the dentist next Thursday. I don’t know what for, and neither does she.

A checkup, one imagines.

Usually, a three-month wait follows the post insertions. Then the new teeth are screwed into the posts. Currently, her posts sport temporary teeth.

My temp tooth fell off twice in the first month, so I just passed the next two months looking like a Caribbean pirate.

Modern dental technology is amazing and, of course, it costs far less here than it does above the Rio Bravo.

Another great reason to live in Mexico.

* * * *

And that’s all the news for this morning.

Lazy Sunday

colorcasa

WE DECIDED to veg out on Sunday. We often do that.

After driving downtown for a restaurant meal at Mexican lunch time, 2 o’clock, we returned about 3:30, put on our jammies, and started a movie on Netflix.

After an hour, however, we got antsy, so we paused the movie (City of Tiny Lights, quite good), got dressed again and headed out the gate for a neighborhood stroll.

I carried the camera.

Generally preferring black & white photography, I made an exception for the top shot because it’s all about color.

It’s a relatively new house near us that was constructed about two years ago. It’s the only casa in the barrio that gives us competition in the color category. But let’s continue on.

mural1

This is a mural right off the plaza. It’s pretty new too. The fellow looking over the mountains is Lázaro Cárdenas, president of Mexico in the late 1930s, and the guy responsible for nationalizing the oil industry, a mistake.

boys

We sat on a steel bench on the plaza and watched people. There weren’t many people out and about, but these two boys were enjoying non-electronic toys.

trio

These ladies were sitting outside a small store.

mural2

This wall facing the plaza is directly next to the 16th Century church. That’s church property behind the wall. Some young folks painted this stuff a few months ago. It includes Pancho Villa and the obligatory Ché Guevara.

I’ve thought about coming down here one night and blotting Ché out, but I likely will never get around to it.

Pancho Villa was no prize either.

door

Before we headed back to the Hacienda, I entered an open building, turned around, and took this photo. I like open-door photos. The entryway gave access to an interior courtyard where local ladies cook and sell grub on Sundays.

Over open fires.

I took about 25 shots total, but I didn’t want to test your patience as most people would do. These are my favorites.

Tale of two births

old long
Crawford W. Long Memorial Hospital in Atlanta.

MY WIFE AND I entered the world in very different times, places and circumstances.

The top shot is where I debuted on the morning of 30 August 1944 at 4:23 a.m. I reportedly kept my mother sweating and hollering for hours, but she finally pushed me out.

World War II was still in progress. Hitler and Mussolini were still alive. Napoleon was not.

The hospital’s name was Crawford W. Long Memorial. It’s still in Atlanta, but it’s now Emory University Hospital.

house.jpg
A street in Uruapan, Michoacán.

This is where my child bride entered the world on 22 September 1960. The Hippie Era had not begun, but it would not be long in coming. Hitler and Mussolini were dust.

This is not a hospital, as you can plainly see. It is where her family lived. I took the photo about two years ago, but I imagine it didn’t look much different in 1960.

She was born at home, delivered by her father who was a surgeon and family practice physician.

This house in Uruapan, Michoacán, was both home to the family, and it housed Dad’s medical office too.

Yes, the two of us entered the world in very different times, places and circumstances, but we ended up together.

The Goddess works in mysterious ways.

Card from Mexico

bedroom

THERE I WAS, sitting on the green equipal loveseat with my back to the window where morning sunlight was pouring in. My child bride had just made up the bed and departed from the bedroom, leaving me alone.

Well, that looks nice, I said to myself, so I shot a photo.

Another postcard from Mexico.