The truth about Roma

romaTHE MOVIE Roma is receiving lots of hoopla, as is its star, an indigenous schoolteacher from the Mexican state of Oaxaca and first-time actress with the name of Yalitza Aparizio.

The hoopla perhaps is greatest over Aparizio.

At the risk of being labeled a Philistine — I don’t care — I hold a less breathy opinion of the movie and its star who has been nominated for an Academy Award (Best Actress!), something I find silly.

The movie is quite good, but it’s no Casablanca or Sophie’s Choice. It’s not even The Wild Bunch, another movie set in Mexico.

I’ve seen Casablanca maybe three times, Sophie’s Choice twice, and The Wild Bunch about 14 or 15 times. It’s a cult classic. I’m a cultist.

Roma is quite good. It has subtleties I doubt many people outside of Mexico will notice and/or understand. I’ve seen it twice. I did the repeat after reading that lots of nuances are missed the first time, so a second visit is advisable. I liked it more the first time.

But I’ll grant it’s a very good movie. That is if you can make it past the first 20-25 minutes which are glacially slow. Snooze time.

Now let’s move onto the star, Aparizio. For most of the movie her character is as deadpan as Keanu Reeves. It requires little talent to deadpan. However, this is one of the subtleties non-Mexicans will miss. Domestics in Mexico are indeed deadpan more often than not.

This is especially true if they’re indigenous.

The only scene in Roma where Aparizio shines is the segment in the hospital where she has her baby. It’s a gripping scene, and she does a great job of acting. Kudos to her.

Here is why the movie, and Aparizio especially, are receiving so much praise and why she’s laughably been nominated for an Oscar. The movie pushes all the PC buttons for Hollywood types.

  1. Filmed in black and white.
  2. There are subtitles.
  3. The star is Mexican
  4. The star is indigenous and female.

These factors have sent America’s West and Northeast coasts into a swoon. I predict the movie will win the Best Picture Oscar and Aparitzio will win as Best Actress, all for the four reasons just stated.

Recall that the 2013 Best Picture winner was 12 Years a Slave, another movie dear to politically correct hearts. After winning that year, it came to light that a number of Academy members voted for 12 Years a Slave without actually having seen the movie. Incredible.

So Aparizio will take the Oscar home.

And in another year, she will be forgotten, back to teaching in Oaxaca, and there’s nothing wrong with that. Good teachers have value.

The Oscar has become as political as the Nobel Prize, a fact that has rendered them virtually meaningless. Aparizio’s winning as Best Actress will be up there with Barry Obama winning the Peace Prize and Bob Dylan the prize for Literature. Sad.

Goulash, first dates & gnomes

LAST NOVEMBER, I wrote about a Sunday drive. If you wish, you can revisit it here. During most of last month, due to the gasoline crisis that left most gas stations empty, we didn’t drive anywhere for fun, just necessity.

But we’re back to normal with the gas stations, so we took a ride around our huge lake yesterday. The principal objective was to eat lunch in a restaurant named Campestre Alemán. We just call it the German restaurant.

I shot photos and videos so you could feel like you were with us.

I filmed this video from our table which overlooked the restaurant’s man-made lake, complete with geese.

goulash
Yum, yum, yum!

Here are our plates of goulash. Campestre Alemán serves a mean goulash. I intended to order white German sausage, but it wasn’t available.

This is a photo of another of the restaurant customers. I took this shot because I liked the look of the woman. She did not notice me.

girl
Some things are better in black and white.

Having downed the goulash, we hopped back in the Honda and continued the circular route around the lake. Minutes later, we passed the restaurant where my child bride and I had our first date 18 years ago.

She was so nervous she wanted to bring a niece along for the ride. Luckily, the niece begged off, so we were on our own, as we have remained for almost 17 years.

date
We sat out on the porch you see up there in 2001. It was great.

Continuing along, we passed this odd house, so I braked to take a photo. Some folks exhibit lots of imagination with little money.

oddhouse
Mexican gnomes might live here.

I later spotted this clothesline and the lake beyond.

clothesline
The only view of the lake I have to offer today, but we saw it quite a bit.

It was at the end of our jaunt that I shot the video at the very top. We were almost home. The Hacienda is only about mile farther.

Sometimes it’s good to get out of the house.

Climate does change

climate
Photo from the upstairs terraza today as another lovely day dawns.

WEEPY BARRY Obama, as I like to call him, once said, parroting his leftist party line, that “Climate Change” was an existential threat.

This is nonsense. Climate has always changed, and yet here we are.

The climate on my Mexican mountaintop sure changes. In summer, it rains daily. In winter, it doesn’t rain at all with some very rare exceptions. In spring it’s dry and dusty. In fall, it’s quite lovely.

Here’s an interesting, brief video with some sage, clear-thinking, actual scientists setting us straight on the climate-change hysteria.

Don’t worry! Be happy!

A couple of pictures

tita6

THIS ATTRACTIVE woman was sitting nearby the other day as I was enjoying my usual afternoon café Americano negro on the downtown plaza. She has a familiar look, but I can’t quite place her.

And the kid? Got no idea.

And later the same day, at night, I was descending the stairwell at the Hacienda on my way to the king bed when I paused at the scene below and said to myself, “That’s interesting. I’ll take a photo.”

stair