Early bird gets the gas

YESTERDAY MORNING, still partially in pajamas, and still dark outside at just before 7 a.m., I headed out the gate in the Honda, hunting gasoline.

thFor those who don’t know, our new president has severely reduced gasoline supplies to much of the nation in an impossible-to-comprehend tactic to end pipeline theft.

I passed one Pemex station, which was dark. Farther, I passed another Pemex station, which was also dark. I continued and hung a right on the ring road. There in the distance, on the right side, I saw a parked car with blinkers flashing. Bingo!

I knew there was a gas station there, but people waiting does not mean the station is open, and I couldn’t even see how long the line was just yet. Sometimes, they’re half-a-mile long or more.

I drew closer. I was the fifth customer in line, and the station was open for business! It was a G500 station, one of the new brands that have entered Mexico over the past few years. The wait was no more than five minutes because all the pumps were working.

The previous fill-up was done Dec. 31 when I got wind of a gasoline shortage in the state capital. I immediately leaped into the Honda, found a station and filled ‘er up. It was definitely full because I watched the pump turn off automatically. Three times.

On sitting in the car, I was surprised to see the tank read 3/4ths full.  The gauge was malfunctioning. What a time to do so! It remained on 3/4ths for the next two weeks, not budging a centimeter.

By Sunday, I was getting edgy about the remaining gas. If the motor stops, so does the power steering and power brakes. You don’t want that to happen all at once while barreling down the highway.

But the Goddess loves me. When I filled up yesterday morning, the gas gauge corrected itself and moved to the full position.

What really surprised me was that I drove for two weeks and had used only one-fourth of the tank. I was sure I was in the bottom fourth, not the top.

So I’m good for another month or more. The Goddess willing, the new president will have turned on the gas taps again to full.

What’s next? He’ll turn off our water?

Later yesterday, the two of us drove the 50 kilometers to the state capital for shopping at Costco and Walmart. We were severely low on high-end vitttles. But now we’ve restocked and can resume normal life.

And I still have way over three-fourths of a tank of gas.

Noses and gasoline

nose

THIS MORNING, sitting at my computer, reading the news about 7 a.m., I paused to blow my nose. I’ve had a half-assed cold since Sunday.

My right nostril started to bleed … and bleed … and bleed. In a fast moment, it was like I was standing in a slaughterhouse watching the gutting of a hog. It was a torrent, and it would not stop.

After about ten minutes with paper towels and toilet paper, however, I did manage to control the inundation because it coagulated in my nose, and I had a ton of paper pushed up there.

My child bride and I drove to a clinic. An hour later I looked like this. There is lots of gauze up my nostril, and there it will remain till Friday. It’s not very convenient because, as mentioned, I have a cold.

I remember long ago that my mother told me my father had a similar situation one morning, bleeding profusely through the nose.

He was dead a year later.

The doctor prescribed a heavy dose of Vitamin K.

As if the cold weren’t bad enough, there is more.

* * * *

Gas shortage worsens

As mentioned a few days ago, parts of Mexico are suffering a severe shortage of gasoline. Instead of getting better, it’s gotten worse. And, lucky us, it seems the problem is most severe in my state.

gas-lineup

As we drove this morning to the clinic, we passed the Pemex station just up the highway, there was a line of cars at least a half mile long. I stole the above photo off the internet. I don’t know why they are standing there instead of being in their vehicles.

Not a good week hereabouts, neither for noses nor vehicles.

I wish we had bicycles.