Libertarian view

The duet

FOR MANY years, I’ve been singing that promoting multiculturalism is a recipe for disaster. The keyword is promoting. Putting it on a pedestal.

Nobody has ever paid me a dime’s worth of attention. Nobody has ever flatly agreed that I recall. I get either disagreement or, far more often, stony silence.

It’s one of those topics I occasionally address here that sends most everyone scurrying for the nearest exit.

Saying cultural diversity is bad is akin nowadays to saying Jews were good in 1930s Germany. You simply did not say it. It was/is verboten. Saying diversity is bad today, like saying Jews were good in 1930s Germany, can lead to ostracism, loss of job and murder. This is not hyperbole.

Virtually everyone now says they embrace diversity. Whether they actually do or not is another matter.

Individuals, corporations, universities, you name it. They all will tell you they just love diversity to death.

I’m referring to the Western world. You can see diss diversity in other areas of the world without fear because most of the world understands the value of family and nation.

A cyber-amigo put a smile on my face yesterday by emailing me an article published by the Hoover Institution.

Here’s a key sentence: History offers only a few success stories when it comes to diversity.

More often than not over the centuries, multiculturalism has led to mayhem and murder. I feel vindicated somewhat.

I am not singing a solo anymore. I’m part of a duet.

New ImageThe exit is over to your right.

I left it unlocked for you.

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The liberator

VERY INTERESTING video. Author and filmmaker Laurence Jarvik speaks for an hour on the Trump phenomenon. Among other themes, he points out that Trump is neither Democrat nor Republican but another thing altogether.

Trump is a deprogrammer of the American mind.

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Ride to Ucazanastacua

It’s also the road to Cucuchucho.

WE LIVE IN a beautiful area, and some spots approach spectacular, but you have to know where they are.

One is the road to Ucazanastacua.

Yesterday, while my child bride was gossiping downtown with visiting relatives, I decided to take a jaunt.

As you may know, we live near a huge, high-altitude lake. There’s a two-laner that circles that lake, and it’s a nice ride.

But there’s a nearby route that’s relatively unknown. It does not circle the lake, but it abuts it for a spell in a spectacular manner. It reminds me of Route 1 along the Big Sur coast.

Up until about eight years ago, this road was primarily unpaved, consisting of dirt and potholes, only marginally usable. In the rainy season, it was mostly mud.

Then it was paved. It remains, however, little used even though small restaurants are appearing along the way.

I snapped this through the Honda windshield. Lake is to the right.

What the above photo doesn’t show clearly is that along much of the drive, it’s a deep drop-off down to the water. And look! No traffic. On a major holiday weekend.

I did not notice the post till I got home and downloaded the photo. Silly me.
Somebody’s home down thataway.

Being Easter weekend, I spotted a number of crosses along the way. They were decked out in purple crepe paper. The below is not a cross, but it was there for Easter.

Not a cross but an arch.

I stopped at an overlook, rolled down the Honda window and shot this brief video. Bob Dylan was crooning on the car’s music machine and competing with the sound of stiff wind.

I never did get to Ucazanastacua. A sign pointed down a steep road to the water’s edge. I did go through Cucuchucho, however.

And that’s your brief tour for the day. Leave tips in the jar on your way out. A joyous Easter to you Christians. To you Jews, shame on you for what you did! Tsk, tsk, tsk.

No Easter eggs for you people.