Nations are great things

NATIONS ARE different, and that’s what makes them interesting.

I favor national identities and borders that keep them intact. The counter to this opinion is called globalism. Globalists want things to be all tossed together, no borders, where people can hold hands and sing Kumbaya at a moment’s notice.

If there’s an aroma of Patchouli, then all the better.

While I favor nations, I’m not too keen on government, which I think should be kept to a minimum everywhere. I’m a lowercase liberatarian.

Recently, I opened a Facebook page under my real name. Filling in the part about my political druthers, I tried to just put libertarian, but Facebook would not let me. It insisted I put Libertarian Nationalist.

I thought about it for a moment, and I realized I am a nationalist. I favor nations and borders. When I’m in the United States, I favor American nationalism. When I’m in Mexico, I favor Mexican nationalism.

I support a border wall between the United States and Mexico, and I support a border wall between Mexico and Guatemala. Walls make good neighbors.

Related to this is that many years ago the Europeans lost their collective minds and initiated the European Union, a globalist wet dream. Not surprisingly, it was the British who first came to their good senses and departed the EU cage.

In the video above, Nigel Farage, one of my favorite fellows, provides a beautiful description of how the despotic EU works, a description that is so clear that even a nincompoop can understand it.

I offer a tip of the sombrero to the Brits for leaving the EU, even though they only did it by a slim margin. No matter. It worked. With luck, other nations of Europe will get fed up with the EU and do the same thing. Let us pray so.

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(Note: I also addressed this border issue a few weeks ago with In praise of window locks and border walls.)

Clueless Bernie-ites

HILLARY FINALLY said a true thing. She said Bernie Sanders is a one-issue candidate, and she’s correct. He’s all about battling “Wall Street,” she rightly observes.

But then there’s also the “free stuff.” Socialism is all about “free stuff,” which isn’t free at all, of course, but it sounds super.

I just read a column by Stephen Moore, an economic consultant with Freedom Works. The headline is Socialism’s Strange Appeal with a subhead Bernie Sanders and socialism are for those who cannot handle reality.

bern
Young Bern

I’ll put a link to the column later, but I know those who disagree will be as disinclined to read it as I am disinclined to read Salon, Mother Jones, and Huffpost, so here are a few key points:

  1. The remarkable thing about the rise of Bernie Sanders is that his popularity runs counter to how socialism is actually working around the world. Bankrupt Greece, just one example, is modern socialism on steroids.
  2.  Leftists enjoy pointing to Sweden and Denmark as socialist success stories while Sweden and Denmark are back-pedaling as fast as they can.
  3. Economic freedom is the opposite of socialism.

Nations that are economically free have free trade, small welfare states, low taxes, a light hand of regulation, private ownership of the means of production, and the rule of law.

Countries that are economically free have five times the average income ($55,000) of countries that are the least economically free ($9,000). Not only that, economic freedom is also highly correlated with better education, improved health, and a cleaner environment.*

The poor do better in nations that are economically free and worse in Bernie Sanders land. You can read Moore’s complete column here. It ain’t that long.

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* Most of this is lifted verbatim from Moore’s column.

The paint job

MEXICO IS the perfect land for libertarians. The government pretty much leaves you alone. The photo illustrates this beautifully.

There are no safety nets, no safety harnesses, no safety helmets, no safety nada. These guys are free to plunge to their deaths, and I imagine sometimes they do.

Walking down a cobblestone street yesterday, sugar donut in hand, inhaling the cool air of late May, I happened upon this painting project, and I sighed with pleasure, knowing I would never see this above the Rio Bravo. It would be unthinkable. There are laws, you know.

And, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2012 — the most recent numbers available — 110 million Americans, about a third of the population, live in a home that receives government handouts, and that does not include Social Security and Medicare.

Won’t be long before the most noticeable difference between the United States and bankrupt Greece is that Greeks speak Greek and Americans speak Spanish English.

These things flashed through my mind as I walked by the sky-high house painters on the cobblestone street. I smiled and took another munch of my sugar donut.

Mexico: Land of the free. Home of the brave.

President Paul?

RAND PAUL is kicking off his presidential campaign tomorrow, though it looks like he’s already done it.

America could do worse, is already doing far worse.

Sure, Paul’s daddy is a kook, but let’s assume the fruit has fallen far enough from the tree. Rand has exhibited some kookiness of his own in the past, particularly in the area of foreign affairs. Isolationism’s time has passed, but Rand seems to have cooled on that stance, thank God.

Which brings me to one of his most attractive features: He’s not thumping the Bible. Even my boy Ted Cruz’s first campaign video was chockablock with Bible talk.

And Ben Carson? Lordy.

Now I have absolutely nothing against the Christian tradition — quite the contrary — but I want a candidate who keeps it to himself for the most part. We live, alas, in increasingly secular times, and the Church Lady talk turns off too many “independents” these days.

It’s time for practicality, time to send Democrats packing.

Now that things are warming with Communist Cuba, maybe we can ship them all to Havana. They think they would like it down there. But they wouldn’t.