The cage where Trump dumps children

PERHAPS YOU’VE heard about the “cages” where children dragged into the United States illegally by their “parents” — sometimes parents, often not — are summarily dumped by the Trump Administration.

This lie is put forth by hysterical, leftist Democrats, a redundancy.

While the Obama Administration released everyone almost immediately, the Trump Administration, rightly so, are locking up the adult illegals. If they are accompanied by minors, those kids are put into facilities like the one you see here, undoubtedly the best places they’ve ever lived in their lives.

The kids are separated from their adult companions precisely because the adults are going into a cage, the slammer, which is where they belong.

If foreigners arrive with children at a port of entry and request asylum legally, they are not jailed, not separated, and are allowed to stay in the United States until their cases are decided. This can take years.

It all seems reasonable to me.

For more details, read this.

Sometimes, it’s not “cages” where Democrats say the kids are being held, it’s concentration camps! See this silliness right here.

 

Tyranny and lunacy

IN THE PREDAWN darkness of every morning, I turn on this computer — a nice, hot coffee at my side — and I commence eyeball-rolling.

What prompts this is reading news from above the Rio Bravo, the goings-on in that once-great nation, things that would cause me to burst out in hysterical laughter were not the events so tragic.

Let’s focus on just two grim examples today. The first comes from the rotting culture. The second has to do with ever-fading freedom in what once was the Land of Liberty — the home of the free and the brave!

rainbowFirst:  The federal government is painting the porous southern border and its lawlessness with rainbow colors. Yes, the same people who lit the White House with childlike Crayolas have now extended that rainbow to the very edge of my home of Mexico.

And in so doing, they have applied the “gender identity” silliness to the Border Patrol. New rules include phrases like “gender conforming,” “intersex,” “gender identity,” “gender nonconforming,” and so on.

This is, of course, the type of arrant babble that emanates from the Oval Office and universities, the sort of stuff that only people who vote the Democrat Party subscribe to. Sensible folks know there are only two genders and the rare quirk of nature called hermaphrodites.

hammerSecond:  This has to do with liberty. In order to keep money rolling into government coffers to fund the ballooning, European-style, welfare state, all levels of government increasingly intrude into private affairs to threaten and extort.

You cannot even charge to braid hair in Texas without paying the government, just one example of the growing tyranny of “occupational licensing,” which is a fancy-pants term for “you want to work, you give us a cut.” This is called a protection racket when guys named Guido do it.

Yes, every morning I read this stuff, this nonsense, this government oppression, and I weep for my former nation. Then I go downstairs and have a toasted bagel with Philly cheese, lite. I breathe a sigh of relief for being south of the Rio Bravo where life is sweet and free.

Tricky Dick’s truth

A FEW MONTHS ago I read my first political memoir. It was Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary of War by Robert M. Gates. Having never read a political memoir, I don’t recall why I started with Gates.

But I found it so interesting, I decided to plow on. Next up was In My Time: A Personal and Political Memoir by Dick Cheney. Then came Donald Rumsfeld’s Known and Unknown Deluxe: A Memoir. After Rumsfeld I was totally out of control, so I read Decision Points by George W. Bush.

Bush’s book is less a traditional memoir than the others. He took a different tack, focusing a bit on his life but primarily on several important decisions he made as president, and elaborating on them.

Bush’s book is my favorite so far. It raised my opinion of him considerably. Of course, memoirs invariably paint a positive portrait of its author, but even with that as a given, I still came away thinking highly of Dubya, as I often have called him, which now shames me.

I left the United States when Bill Clinton was president, so I observed Bush’s years in office from afar, but that’s not difficult in these high-tech times. I’m ashamed to say that I long embraced the left-wing (I am a fully recovered Democrat) notion that George W. was something of a dimwit, a lightweight, and that Cheney was the de facto president.

Simply was not so.

Gates seems like a good guy. Cheney and Rumsfeld have reputations as right-wing hard-asses, but knowing far more of their lives makes them more human, especially Cheney even if he is truly a right-wing hard-ass, something I do not hold against him these days, having become one myself.

After Bush, I had considered reading RN: The Memoirs of Richard Nixon but at 1,400 pages I decided no and opted instead to read Nixon’s Leaders: Profiles and Reminiscences of Men Who Have Shaped the Modern World. I’m just getting into that, and Nixon’s telling me about Winston Churchill.

Churchill was a writer of histories. I tried one of his histories recently and found it turgid.

Possibly next in the memoir list will be Condoleezza Rice’s No Higher Honor: A Memoir of My Years in Washington. The free Kindle sample sits in the sample file, one of the great aspects of the Kindle.

You may be thinking: What is it that inspired this post’s headline? Tricky Dick’s truth.  It was this quote I found in his chapter on Winston Churchill:

“The difference between politics before and after Watergate is striking … Today the chances of receiving much approval or esteem for accomplishments in public life are slim. The risks of glaring invasions of privacy are much greater, and the kinds of sacrifices and disclosures required for entering politics … have simply become prohibitive for many. This is bound to affect detrimentally both the quality and the number of men and women who are willing to present themselves for public office.”

nixonI have taken this position before, most recently in Newspaper days: Houston. I was quite surprised to see Tricky Dick parroting me. The quality of people in public life has fallen. This is true of both Democrats and Republicans,* and my former occupation — the news media — is responsible for that to a huge degree.

A nation reflects its leaders and the leaders are mediocre. The future looks very dicey.

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Bonus material: You likely noticed that all the memoirs mentioned are written by conservatives. Not to worry. A few days ago, occasional Moon reader and commenter Kim G. of Boston gifted me via Kindle with John Dean’s Conservatives Without Conscience. It is on my list, and I may actually read it, but I’m unsure when. It’s like gifting the Bible to the Devil. The Amazon book description reveals that Dean says conservatives are authoritarian and present a danger to democracy. We are evil people.

But I am sure that Barry Obama would agree with that.

Dean was one of the principals who tried to cover up the Watergate situation for Nixon. He admitted in court to forwarding hush money and confessed to obstruction-of-justice charges. He had earlier asked Nixon for immunity to the obstruction charges. Nixon refused, and Dean was fired. With this background it would be a bit hard to take his book knocking conservatives very seriously.

Smells of revenge.

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* Far truer of Democrats than Republicans, of course.