Tag Archives: old white men

PC TV

(Warning: the following post is not advisable for Mennonites, evangelical Christians or 8-year-old children.)

AFTER A HARD day of work, we customarily spend evenings quietly at home sprawled in recliners before the Samsung Smart TV, eating salads and watching something on Netflix.

We are often appalled at what we see.

It is no secret that American universities have become indoctrination centers for raging leftists, that movies coming out of Hollywood relentlessly push political correctness, but television is another matter because any 8-year-old can turn it on and stand slack-jawed before the screen.

What he sees is a combination of lies and deviancies.

* * * *

First, the lies!

Most current series give the impression that many, if not the majority, of romantic relationships and marriages are interracial. This, of course, is arrant nonsense.

Most couples, the world over, are the same race. The exceptions are a minuscule minority. This fact, however, conflicts with the left’s idolizing of diversity and multiculturalism.

So a large percentage of television dramas is a form of reeducation camp that any 8-year-old child can flip on at will while mama’s in the kitchen washing  the dishes.

We just started the second season of Secrets and Lies, a pretty good ABC series starring the normally scenery-chewing Juliette Lewis as a deadpan police detective.

The story line revolves around a rich family where the father is white and his adult kids are black. In the first show, mother is mentioned but not seen just yet. She’ll have to be black for this family to even be genetically feasible.

This is not rare. The script gymnastics the television industry puts itself through to “diversify” families is laughable. Multiracial and multicultural families on television far exceed their numbers in the real world. It is inaccurate and silly.

It is political.

* * * *

Now, the deviancy!

According to the television industry, homosexuals are everywhere. Every family either has gay members or knows numerous gay couples. Yeah, sure.

Modern Family is a great example. A gay couple belongs to the family, a gay couple who’ve adopted an Asian child (hitting the multicultural drum). There’s also an Old White Man married to a young, hot Latina.* Modern Family pours it on.

It’s another ABC show.

Not even the president of the United States is immune. In the series House of Cards the president occasionally gets it on with a guy. It’s a good series, but does the president really have to be a switch-hitter? An unnecessary script element.

Blatant indoctrination, Ho Chi Minh-style.

What percentage of humanity is actually gay? Hard to say. A Washington Post story cites a poll that indicates it’s about 1.6 percent. Gallup, on the other hand, tells you it’s about 3.8 percent. I’ve never seen a number higher than that.

Taking these figures as two extremes, that means the number of people who are neither gay nor lesbian range between 98.4 percent to 96.2 percent. Dang near everyone.

This is, in political terms, a landslide for straights, something you’d never know from watching television dramas where gays are as common as the lovable aunt and the cute pooch.

And they’re always kissing. They kiss far more than the straight couples. Kiss, kiss, kiss!

Not surprisingly, most Americans now think homosexuals are considerably more numerous than they are.

This is propaganda in action.

Gallup reports too that the U.S. public believes gays make up almost a quarter of the population! The television industry/reeducation camps are stunningly effective.

Again, this is all political.

Let us continue with the gay theme. First, I chose the word deviancy over perversion intentionally. Perversion is a value judgment. Deviancy simply means outside the norm.

One may or may not consider homosexuality a perversion. However, its being outside the norm is indisputable.

I don’t give a hoot if someone is gay. And I do not believe it’s a choice any more than my being straight is a choice.

We are what we are.

Back to the television industry. It is not content to simply insist that gays are everywhere. Increasingly, it wants to show us precisely what gays do in the privacy of their homes.

It’s way overboard.

* * * *

Barebacking and strap-ons!

Just recently we were watching a fun series called Penny Dreadful starring, among others, the stunning and yummy Eva Green.

Then one evening, there it was, anal, homosexual sex in a graphic manner that once was reserved for sticky-floored movie houses frequented by men in brown overcoats.

It was totally gratuitous, deviant sex that, once again, is available to any 8-year-old who turns on the television.

Are the people who make this out of their minds? No, they simply want you to get on board with this diversity thing.

It is political.

Let us move on now. A couple of weeks ago, we began a new series, but never got further than the first show. We were stopped dead in our proverbial tracks by lesbian love!

Two lovely lesbians going at it (one black, one white!) with vigor on the bed. They finish and the topmost disconnects and tosses an oily, strap-on penis to the floor. Ker-plop!

Camera lingers on firm, rubber penis.

This isn’t pay-for-view. It’s regular, commercial television.

I don’t care if people do this stuff. Power to them. But do it at home. If you want to film, do so and sell it to adults. Bring back the dingy theaters. Don’t make it available to 8-year-olds.

But, it’s political, and you know which side is doing it.

It ain’t my side. We have standards.

* * * *

* This sounds sort of familiar. Not sure why,

Mulatto Ville

WE ESCAPED the Mardi Gras celebration in our hardscrabble neighborhood over the weekend by heading to the Gringo-invested burg of San Miguel de Allende.

I always find San Miguel unsettling to the soul. There is something just not right about it. It’s about as Mexican as I am, which is to say legally yes, spiritually no.

Perhaps Disneyland, but better: Mulatto* Ville.

It’s a combination of two very different worlds. Two mindsets, two races,** two cultures. And they do not stir well.

Oil and water.

Walking around downtown San Miguel, it’s all I can do to not burst out in howling laughter. The rayon shirts, the Bermuda shorts, the Birkenstocks, the berets, the feathers in the hat bands, the old white women*** wearing native blouses, the art paint smeared preciously on khaki pants.

So one might wonder, why do you go there? The main answer is restaurants. Mulatto Ville has great places to eat.

I enjoy eating.

And this recent trip was also to visit an old friend from high school who was wintering there, a retired university professor who included Marco Rubio among her students.

Another beautiful day in Dolores Hidalgo.

We took a drive north to Dolores Hidalgo where we had not gone directly downtown in a long time. We were pleasantly surprised, shocked even.

It’s a wonderful city that’s been undergoing renovation for a few years. Most of the plaza has been closed to vehicles. The church has been painted. Much of downtown too.

Some good restaurants and hotels can be found. And, unlike San Miguel, which has horrible streets and sidewalks, Dolores Hidalgo is flat, smooth and easily walkable.

It’s also one of Mexico’s main sources of talavara ceramics,**** the quantities of which are astounding and beautiful.

Next time we flee our area due to Carnival, we’ll be staying in Dolores Hidalgo, not south in Mulatto Ville.

In Dolores Hidalgo I spotted nary a Birkenstock*****.

* * * *

* I am playing loose with the word, of course. A true mulatto is the offspring of one white parent and one black one, à la Barry Hussein Obama who “identifies” as black.

** Oh, I know Mexican is not a race, but bear with me.

*** Why does everyone complain about Old White Men but never about Old White Women?

**** The other is Puebla. FYI.

***** My second ex-wife, now an Old White Woman, used to cringe at my own Birkenstocks, so perhaps I should avoid this point. Nowadays I sport Crocs but only at home.

Granny’s farm

AS MENTIONED a time or three, I spent much of my youth at Granny’s house, actually living there full-time my first six years.

It was my grandfather’s house too, but he died when I was 12, so I associate the house primarily with my grandmother, my mother’s mother.

The whole lot of us — me, my older sister, my mother and father — lived on the farm right after World War II. I wonder what my grandparents thought of that, having daughter come home with a family in tow.

Fortunately, there were three bedrooms in the big, clapboard house, which was built around 1890 by Granny’s father, a fabulously wealthy farmer who was named Dard Moree.

After moving to Jacksonville, Florida, just before I started the Second Grade, we returned often to visit. My mother was an only child, you see, and you know how that goes. Powerful parental connections.

I often think of this place and those days that were so different.

One of my favorite pastimes was to take walks. This was a 500-acre farm, mind you, and the house was set more or less in the northeast quadrant. Usually, I would take these walks alone, and there were two ways to go. Forward from the house was one, and behind the house was the other.

* * * *

SETTING OUT

pumpLet’s go forward first. The house faced a dirt road that went from the Five Points General Store a few miles to the right to the bustling metropolis of Sylvester, Georgia, to the left, passing first through a few inconsequential settlements and one gas station.

Walking off the front porch, crossing that road (which today is a paved highway) you were facing a field that sloped downward to a narrow creek about a quarter mile away. I don’t remember much ever being in that field, sometimes a horse, but we didn’t do horses. We did cows.

The creek ran, more or less, parallel to the dirt road above and, as is often the case, the creek had trees lining its edges. It was a very small creek that you could leap across or step over using stones or confused tree roots.

Greenery of all sorts loves a good creek.

So I would walk down to the creek just because it was cool in the summer, which is the season I spent most time there after moving to Florida, and there were minnows to watch. Turtles too at times.

And the sound of the water, which was incredibly clear, passing over and around those confused tree roots and stones.

It was simply a fine place to be.

That was the forward walk, a pretty simple proposition, but it sits well in my memory, and I wish I could do it again, but I cannot.

Then there’s the backward walk.

* * * *

GOING THE OTHER WAY

At a right angle to the dirt road, there was a set of two parallel ruts formed by tires of pickups and tractors (We had Ford tractors.) that formed an even simpler road that ran along the house’s left side, going behind, and continued to the pond and beyond to plenty of corn.

cowAs you walked along these tire ruts, there was a large grove of pecan trees to the right, plus the really humongous chicken house (abandoned when we left), plus a storage/tractor shed.

On the left was a field that usually contained Hereford cows. They grazed there, but they also hung out under the pecans because there was no fence. I say cows, but there always was one bull because, well, you know.

Like Route 1, this consisted of about a quarter mile too. Then, if you continued ahead, you’d come to a broad expanse of corn rows that went on and on. You can get lost in a corn field, you know, but not forever.

But just before the corn started and the pecan grove ended, you could angle down to the left, heading northwest on your walk, down what was usually a broad gully that ended at the pond, which was named Wavering.

* * * *

BABY IN A TREE

This pond, it seems, has been there for centuries. Local lore has it — and maybe it’s true — that a last battle between nasty “old” white men and noble “Native Americans” took place on the shores of Waving Pond.

babyNot so much a battle as a rout, it is said — the “Native Americans” fared badly — and that those Indians hightailed it out of there so fast that a baby was left behind hanging from a tree limb.

According to the story, the baby was adopted and raised by a loving, white family to be a good Christian who ate at a pine table with forks and knives and napkins and good manners.

And that is the story.

* * * *

WATER AND CYPRESS

The pond is about two acres, which is to say very large, a lake, actually. You cannot see from one end to the other, but that’s due more to the proliferation of towering cypress trees than it is to sheer distance.

There was always a rowboat waiting there, pulled out of the water and tied with a rope, and two oars. I traveled many a day in that boat, looking over the rail into the murky water where lurked snakes, turtles and fish.

My mother swam there in the 1920s and 1930s, diving from a board nailed high on a cypress tree. But I never jumped into those dark waters.

You never knew what you could encounter.

I’m not sure anyone knew the pond’s source, the overgrowth and trees made it difficult to pinpoint one, but I did my best to find it. There were arms of water that would veer off at certain points, but you could only go so far in that rowboat before you were blocked by fallen limbs.

There were other places to walk on Granny’s farm, of course. Just going out into the pecan grove to scoop fallen nuts was good eating, and there was a third walk, also across the dirt road — but farther to the right — that would take you to huge fields of peanuts and cotton that had truck ruts through the middle that made for fine walking in summer’s sun.

* * * *

CAP BAITING A HOOK

But before leaving Wavering Pond, here’s the only photo I can find of it. I tossed so much when I left Houston, too much. This is Cap, who was Granny’s handyman for decades and all through my childhood.

He and his wife, Willie, our maid, lived in a mighty humble house provided by my grandparents just across the road and down a bit. He’s baiting a fishhook on the edge of Wavering Pond.

Cap loved whisky and never uttered a word more than necessary. He died when I was in my mid-20s. My father found him on the floor. I have no clue how old Cap was. Regrettably, we took him for granted.

Cap was the in-between generation, between Reconstruction and the Civil Rights Movement, between President Grant and President Johnson.

And he liked to fish in Wavering Pond.

cap

Kitchens and virgins

Tank space

CONSTRUCTION WORK continues at the Hacienda. In the photo above, you see a second-story brick wall going up that will serve to hide the water tank that will sit up there above the lavatory.

As previously announced, the initial plan of building a storefront has been modified. While the new space will have a large opening to the street so it can be rented or used as a storefront, our new plan is to outfit the area as a big, stand-alone kitchen where my wife can bake her stupendous pastries to hawk on the downtown plaza.

The new roof has been installed. Instead of just the traditional clay tiles that were there before, an additional subroof of plywood was added and the tiles now sit atop that. It makes for a tighter environment for the kitchen. The plywood will be painted to match the exposed wood beams that support the roof.

Saturday marks the end of the work’s third week and a photo album of the construction is here. The contractor initially told us the work would take four to six weeks, but that ain’t gonna happen.

The floor still has to be cemented and ceramic tile laid, the plumbing and electrical must be completed, the interior walls finished and painted, the door to the street installed, the propane tank, kitchen sink, bathroom sink, potty, water heater installed, the septic tank excavated. In short, God knows when it will be done.

* * * *

But Friday was more than just another construction day. It also was the Virgin of Guadalupe’s day. As you may know, the Virgin of Guadalupe is the personal virgin of us Mexicans. She is special to us because she is brown-skinned as most of us are. She is not just some old white virgin, and we love her for that.

Old white virgins — like old white men — are passé, so yesterday.

There was a parade downtown today, and there will be earth-shaking concerts on our local plaza Friday and Saturday nights. December 12 is when the Virgin was born, or was first spotted, or maybe her resurrection. I really don’t keep up with these things. I can’t keep Jesus’ or Moses’ lives straight, much less a Mexican virgin’s.

portal

I was downtown in mid-afternoon, and I shot this photo. It was tranquil — which is how I prefer it — the calm before the storm. But before I departed two hours later, there was a blaring taxi parade and associated drums, clarinets and tubas. The virgin apparently loves racket.

I got out just in the nick of time via a back street.