Let’s have a chat!

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Motion-sensor light that was poorly aimed.

A CANADIAN who goes by Kris because that’s his name mentioned on another blog today that he does not have a blog because his life lacks events that are sufficiently interesting to merit a write-up. Truth is, you can write about anything.

It’s often not so much the topic but how you present it.

Steve Cotton who lives inexplicably in Casa Cotton in the sweltering, insect-infested, Mexican beach town of Melaque often writes on potentially boring subjects, but his manner of writing makes it interesting. I’ll return to this theme down the way.

* * * *

Steve’s latest post was not on a boring topic. It was a death.

Yesterday, Steve wrote about Ken Kushnir, a first-generation American whose family hailed from Russia and who retired to Mexico many years ago from California with his Honduran wife. Ken died a few weeks ago.

I knew Ken, and I liked him. He was always smiling.

Ken, like Steve, like me, wrote a blog. His nom de internet was Tancho. His is the latest death among a group of Gringo bloggers who moved to Mexico in the last 20 or so years.

Another went by Sparks, but his real last name was Parks. And there was John Calypso who wrote an interesting blog dubbed Viva Veracruz which has been taken offline. Also, not long ago, Michael Warshauer died of cancer. The focus of his blog, My Mexican Kitchen, was, not surprisingly, on cooking and eating. He was a retired baker.

It seems we’re dropping like those proverbial flies.

Ken Kushnir, R.I.P. And, a tad tardy, Michael Warshauer too. Another good guy gone.

* * * *

But back to the topic of blog-writing and how having an interesting life is not required, though it surely helps. A bit of imagination can put, with luck, a fairly engaging spin on most dreary doings. Let’s look briefly at my fascinating day so far.

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A neatly trimmed bougainvillea!

I noticed recently that the motion-sensor light attached to the outside of our bedroom was not coming on when I walked up the Romance Sidewalk from the most critical direction at night. I climbed a ladder to adjust it this morning. Can’t test it till tonight.

I do incredible things.

(Update: The adjustment worked! Just so you know.)

Also today, I stopped procrastinating about trimming the bougainvillea you see in the photo. It’s one of four bougainvilleas in the Hacienda yard, plants I wish I’d never installed here way back when, about 16 years ago.

I went so far as to skip my customary exercise walk around the plaza this morning in order to adjust the light, trim the bougainvillea and write this blather for you. I did complete my gym routine at 7:30, however. I have a gym set here upstairs, and I use it.

The Canadian Kris (see first paragraph) used to leave good comments fairly frequently here, but he decided to stop when I took issue with a positive comment he made about the communist dictatorship of Cuba. Quite a few Canadians seem to have a positive view of Cuba, incredibly. Commenters come and go. It’s an interesting phenomenon.

Kris is welcome to come back. But Canadians are oddballs.

You never know who is reading your stuff. I recently heard from my daughter after a very long absence. She used to read my website years ago, and maybe still does. And she’d leave comments on rare occasion, sometimes to cuss me out.

Yes, I am a defective dad. As was my father before me.

She said that she’d uncovered some of her paternal grandfather’s artwork tucked away in her home. My father liked to paint. And she noticed for the first time some were reproductions of famous artists. Like my father, I also was an artist of sorts.

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My father’s copy of a Winslow Homer piece from 1899.
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Here is how Homer did it.

About the same time, I received an unexpected email from my last ex-wife. Aside from the occasional birthday greeting, I never hear anything from her, so this was a surprise. She wanted to know why I am a Trump fan. She seemed genuinely mystified, and she asked politely, as most Trump foes do not, so I sent her a reply that went something like this:

  1. Trump thumbs his nose daily at Political Correctness, a movement that is quite literally destroying Western Civilization.
  2. He knows the need for borders, and is doing what he can about it.
  3. He’s fighting the Regulatory State and making headway. I don’t recall any other president even mentioning the growing threat of the Regulatory State. Do you?

My response to her was a bit more detailed on those three points. Of course, there are numerous excellent reasons to be a Trump fan, but those are the three I mentioned.

I also mentioned to her the #WalkAway campaign, a movement of former Democrats like me who have abandoned that nefarious party. It’s most visible on YouTube.

Here’s a thoughtful video by a woman who worked in the Clinton Administration. She states why she’s abandoned the Democrat Party and is now a Trump supporter.

I’ve long wondered if my ex-wife reads my website, so she does. I’ve never mentioned my Trump love directly to her. I invited her to join me on the Trump Train because there is room for her. We do not discriminate. We’re a diverse bunch of cheerful folks.

Some of us make moonshine and marry our cousins, but most do not.

It was strange that I received communication from both my daughter and my last ex-wife in the same week. It’s always nice to hear from them, rare as it is.

I think our chat has come to an end. I probably should pack my bag for Guadalajara.

Sober view of Trump

“It’s almost as if Don Rickles were running for president.”

FORMER FOX NEWS star Bill O’Reilly writes books now and then, and they’re always big sellers. But I’d never bought one till now. His latest is The United States of Trump, and it’s a goodie, a sober look at the phenomenon in the Oval Office.

trumpIt’s a 320-page history, neither pro nor con, as objective a view as you’ll find, of Donald John Trump, his childhood, the ups and downs of his real estate empire, his family life, his The Apprentice fame and finally his spectacular leap into politics.

Love him — as I do — or hate him, it’s a well-written and informative bio. O’Reilly looks at Trump’s pluses and minuses, his touchy personality, his love life, the near collapse of his real estate empire in the 1980s, its resurgence in the 1990s, his driving ambition, his tendency to steamroll opposition, his love of self. You name it, O’Reilly addresses it.

O’Reilly, clearly a conservative but who claims to be an independent, is what journalists are supposed to be, but so rarely are anymore, objective. Believe it.

The quote at top is O’Reilly’s. He is referring to Trump’s 2016 race, a campaign that shoved the boundaries of normally accepted presidential standards of behavior onto new ground, a territory where gravitas does not exist, where only victory matters.

Buy it. Read it. You won’t regret it. Thank me later.

Trump’s good works, cont’d

AS THOSE WHO vote Democrat continue to writhe on the floor, screaming, because Hillary blew “her turn,” the good works of the Blond Bomber soldier on. To wit:

thumb-up-icon-back-fillThe share of American workers satisfied with their paychecks rose last year, and “the biggest leap came from millennials and Generation Z, whose enthusiasm for their compensation shot from 36% in 2017 to nearly 46% a year later,” The Wall Street Journal reports.

In all, nearly 54% of U.S. workers said they were satisfied with their jobs in 2018, the highest share reported in more than two decades.

But wait, there’s more:

thumb-up-icon-back-fillEver since President Trump insisted that China halt exports of illicit opioids to the United States, the flow of lethal fentanyl-style drugs coming to America from China has collapsed, David Fickling writes for Bloomberg. “It could be that 2019 is the year when the U.S. finally started to turn the tide in the opium war,” he says. “What’s more, the success may be coming as a result of that most improbable activity, cooperation between the U.S. and Chinese governments.”

Hold onto your MAGA hats, there’s even more:

thumb-up-icon-back-fill“To say that many liberal elites have all but given up on educating low-income minorities might seem like an overstatement. But when you consider the state of public education in our inner cities, and the priorities of those in charge, it’s hard to draw any other conclusion,” Jason Riley writes in The Wall Street Journal. The racial achievement gap is a main driver of inequality in New York City, for example, where Democrat Mayor Bill De Blasio is looking to shut down the charter schools where mostly low-income students have passage rates of greater than 90 percent for math and English.

That’s right. De Blasio wants to shut non-government schools in spite of their doing a far better job of educating students than do government/union schools.

I imagine you’ve not read any of the positive news I just cited, and that’s because the corrupt mainstream media ignores good Trump news. Again, I recommend you go to the White House website and subscribe to newsletters.

Get it straight from the horse’s mouth. You won’t get it elsewhere. Sad.

And here’s a bonus: