Three cheers for old white men

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A FRIEND SENT this, and I am sharing it with you. It is fun. And accurate.

The midterm elections above the Rio Bravo occur in less than two weeks. How will they turn out? It seems that a significant portion of the citizenry sides with the party in the bottom of the illustration, a fact that makes one’s eyes roll.

The whole lot of them should be sporting propeller beanies. And did you notice Michelle and Barry peeking in from the windows? A nice touch.

But let us pray that sufficient common sense will bubble to the surface, and the party in the top of the illustration will not only stay in the catbird seat but will increase its representation around the nation.

What stands out in the top illustration? It’s the prevalence of old white men. Let us pray that they continue to carry the day. They are your best bet.

For those who want to receive accurate reports on the ever-increasing successes of the Trump Administration, something you will never get from most of the American media, go to the White House website. Sign up for the occasional newsletter and other reports.

Yes, do what I do. Always a good idea.

What the Devil?

mexico
Hordes of Hondurans trying to invade Mexico — and then to the United States.
europe
Hordes of Mohammedans invading Europe.

WELL, IF THIS isn’t a fine how-do-you-do.

At top is a bridge this week at the Mexico-Guatemala border. Mobs of Hondurans hit the border on their mostly unobstructed journey to the United States.

Just below are mobs of Mohammedans invading Europe, mostly with the naive permission of the European Union, all in the name of fellowship and love, an abundance of which was left over from the stoned 1960s.

You can see from the second photo that the mob is mostly young men. I’m guessing most of the Honduran mob is young men too. Quite a few, no doubt, if history indicates anything, have youngsters in tow, related or not, to tug on the heartstrings of the clueless above the Rio Bravo.

Who is to blame in this hemisphere? That would be the U.S. government of both Republican and Democrat administrations going back decades, and their de facto open-border policies that have amounted to invitations to millions down south to just come on up. We’ll take you in.

Who is to blame in Europe? That would be the politically correct European Union that has embraced diversity and multiculturalism with a vengeance. The aftermath of the stoned 1960s also plays a large role in that situation.

Am I unsympathetic to these “migrants” as a whole? I am not. They come from parts of the world with defective, poorly functioning cultures going back centuries. They want a better life, sensibly, and they are hoofing it to better functioning, superior cultures, also going back centuries.

What is likely to be the end result? Will the invaded cultures be uplifted with these inundations of people with drastically different mindsets? Or will things go in the contrary direction? Put your money on the contrary direction, which is already blatantly obvious in much of Europe and the United States.

Some cultures function well. Others do precisely the opposite.

Well-functioning nations need to mind their borders effectively. The fact that well-functioning nations are the minority makes this even more essential.

Bones, hair, cobblestones & cheese

FLY
I was sitting on the Jesus Patio when I shot this guy nearby.

AUTUMN ARRIVES on Saturday, but we’ve already started Fall.

In our hearts, if not in celestial reality.

The leaves are dropping from the peach tree, littering the Jesus Patio, making more work for me, not appreciated.

I like the photo above, so I’ve added it to the header.

Unrelated to fall is that we’ve now entered the third week of my child bride’s broken arm, caused by a fall. The doctor said the cast would stay in place from four to six weeks. We are praying, of course, for four.

The biggest challenge, certainly for me, but for her too, it seems, is her mop of hair. She cannot arrange it to her satisfaction with one hand.

So that leaves me.

We’ve come to verbal blows over this matter.

cdmx
Disheveled on an early morning in Mexico City.

Here she is sitting in our Mexico City condo three years ago. Her hair has not been cut since, so you can imagine. It’s not only long, much longer now than in this photo, but it is quite curly. You might even call it kinky.

We’ve had quite a few emotionally challenging moments due to this mop.

Her getting both her arms back in action cannot come too soon.

Matrimonial bliss hangs on it.

* * * *

And furthermore …

As I’ve written on various occasions, our town is renovating streets, especially around the spectacular plaza.

This has been going on for y-e-a-r-s. Three at least. Nonstop.

street
Just yesterday on the third side of the plaza.

Laying the cobblestones, and sidewalk renovation too, has been completed on two sides of the plaza. Above, you see the third side, and they’ve dug up all the old stones on the fourth, the side that abuts my family coffee shop. We’re in the rainy season, so we have an abundance of mud.

The Goddess willing, this will end before I die.

* * * *

Moving on to cheese

cheese
This is queso seco.

One of the many great things about living south of the Rio Bravo is the abundance of great avocados or, as we call them, aguacates. Another is cheese or, as we call it, queso. We Mexicans love our queso.

Visitors are cautioned to avoid cheese. Sometimes it’s not pasteurized, maybe most of the time. I pay that warning not a lick of attention.

The cheese in the photo is called queso seco or dry cheese. We bought it here on the mountaintop, but recently we found a very small store that sells only cheese on a street corner in the capital city.

The cheese is unrefrigerated, and on our first visit we found wheels of various cheeses sitting on the floor. This would appall a persnickety person, but we bought a quarter kilo, which was exceptionally tasty.

We took it home, ate it happily, and did not die.

Old-style living

line

I WAS HANGING these socks, jeans and towels on the clothesline today when it occurred to me that people north of the Rio Bravo likely don’t do this anymore. You’re all modern and such. Got your gadgets.

When we built the house, we had a gas connection installed there in what Mexicans call the “service patio” in case we ever bought a gas dryer, but we’ve never bought a dryer, 15 years now. We line-dry.

It’s no big deal, and it’s free.

We do have a washer. Same one we purchased 15 years ago.

Sharp eyes may notice two propane tanks. The big one was installed when we built the house, but about two years ago it developed issues, so we bought a new one, the smaller. Next January, we’ll have the big one hauled away.

It’s 99 percent empty.

The manufacturers recommend a shelf date for those things, about a decade. That surprised me. I thought they were good indefinitely, and they likely are used indefinitely by most people if there are no problems.

But we had problems.

When I was a kid in Florida, I recall my mother hanging clothes on a line in the backyard. We had no dryer. I don’t recall a washer either. She must have done them by hand. It was nice seeing white sheets blowing in the wind.

Like in the movies.