Mexican life

Lazy Sunday

colorcasa

WE DECIDED to veg out on Sunday. We often do that.

After driving downtown for a restaurant meal at Mexican lunch time, 2 o’clock, we returned about 3:30, put on our jammies, and started a movie on Netflix.

After an hour, however, we got antsy, so we paused the movie (City of Tiny Lights, quite good), got dressed again and headed out the gate for a neighborhood stroll.

I carried the camera.

Generally preferring black & white photography, I made an exception for the top shot because it’s all about color.

It’s a relatively new house near us that was constructed about two years ago. It’s the only casa in the barrio that gives us competition in the color category. But let’s continue on.

mural1

This is a mural right off the plaza. It’s pretty new too. The fellow looking over the mountains is Lázaro Cárdenas, president of Mexico in the late 1930s, and the guy responsible for nationalizing the oil industry, a mistake.

boys

We sat on a steel bench on the plaza and watched people. There weren’t many people out and about, but these two boys were enjoying non-electronic toys.

trio

These ladies were sitting outside a small store.

mural2

This wall facing the plaza is directly next to the 16th Century church. That’s church property behind the wall. Some young folks painted this stuff a few months ago. It includes Pancho Villa and the obligatory Ché Guevara.

I’ve thought about coming down here one night and blotting Ché out, but I likely will never get around to it.

Pancho Villa was no prize either.

door

Before we headed back to the Hacienda, I entered an open building, turned around, and took this photo. I like open-door photos. The entryway gave access to an interior courtyard where local ladies cook and sell grub on Sundays.

Over open fires.

I took about 25 shots total, but I didn’t want to test your patience as most people would do. These are my favorites.

Mexican life

Falling from heaven

kite

KITES FALL into our yard on a fairly regular basis. They’re interesting glimpses into the culture.

This one fell yesterday. It is, as are they always, homemade.  Three cross-sticks to which is attached plastic from a grocery store bag. In this case, Merza, a local chain. A different color bag, darker, provides strips for the tail. At the end of the tail is tied a couple of leaves to provide some weight and stability.

What you cannot see because I’d already balled it up and tossed it into the trash can is the string. As a chain is only as strong as its weakest link, these homemade kites always have the same weak link, the string, which is sewing thread.

Sewing thread is used, I imagine, for two reasons: It is very light, and if these super-light kites are to soar, light string is required. Also, sewing thread is cheap.

This is a low-budget operation.

Alas, long lengths of sewing thread snap easily at altitude, and the kites fall, often into our yard.

Kids still make their own kites in Mexico. I wish I could return these carefully constructed toys to their owners, but there’s no way to know where they are.